Aboriginal Heritage Trail Glasshouse Mountains

Aboriginal Heritage Trail Glasshouse Mountains

  • Cost 14.30 per student
  • Collect guide(s) from Abbey Museum
  • Discuss the geological forces that formed the Glasshouse Mountains 25 million (plus) years ago
  • Discover the Dream Time legends about the Glasshouse Mountains
  • Visit Bora Ring ceremonial grounds to discuss Aboriginal initiation rites, customs and lore
  • Visit traditional axe-grinding site
  • 3-4 hours including breaks
  • Minimum 20 students
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Aboriginal Heritage Trail Glasshouse Mountains

Aboriginal Heritage Trail Glasshouse Mountains

  • Cost 14.30 per student
  • Collect guide(s) from Abbey Museum
  • Discuss the geological forces that formed the Glasshouse Mountains 25 million (plus) years ago
  • Discover the Dream Time legends about the Glasshouse Mountains
  • Visit Bora Ring ceremonial grounds to discuss Aboriginal initiation rites, customs and lore
  • Visit traditional axe-grinding site
  • 3-4 hours including breaks
  • Minimum 20 students
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Abbey Trivia Night

Join us for another trivia night filled with quick-witted quiz questions designed to enhance your cerebral fitness and of course have some fun with friends (spiced with a little rivalry!). There’s lucky door prizes, fantastic raffle prizes and all proceeds support the stained glass conservation appeal.  This very social evening is finished with a light supper. Price $15

(NB: School aged children free). Time: 6pm registration, Start: 6:30pm.

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Abbey Museum Friends Boat trip

Abbey Museum Friends Sign up

Join the Abbey Museum Friends and become part of this vibrant cultural and educational centre. Your annual subscription enables the Museum to purchase artefacts to enhance the collection, and to conserve objects such as the Medieval Stained Glass from Winchester Cathedral.

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Kids Dig It – Squire Academy 2019

Get your kids out of the house and send them back in time. Your squire will learn about heraldry, train like a knight, and become an archer.

Program will run from 10am – 2pm and is for 8-12 year old children. You can drop your kids off so you can do some Christmas shopping in peace.

10:00 – Drop Off: Parents can drop children off at the museum entrance.

10:00 – 10:30 – Stained glass tour: Children will head into the church to see the collection of stained glass windows. They will learn how they were made and what their purpose was in the Middle ages. Heraldry can be seen in these windows which will be discussed.

10:30 – 11:00 – Designing heraldry: Taking knowledge of the stained glass window heraldry, children will design their own heraldry that is inspired by their family, their personality and medieval imagery.

11:00 – 11:30 – Painting their own shield: Children will take their heraldry and paint it onto a wooden shield they will take home.

11:30 – 12:0 0 – Daily training: …

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Abbey Museum's stained glass window St Hilda

Symbols in Art – Clues and Problems

When we explore medieval religious art you could be astonished by the number of objects being held by the figures depicted either in paint or in stained glass windows. Looking at some of the stained glass windows in the Abbey Church there are a number of saints that follow this medieval tradition. They range from serpents to puppy dogs, from skulls to monstrances. Why are they there? What do they mean?

The use of symbols in figurative art began at a time when very few people could read or write, but also when the Church had a huge influence on the population. The introductions of symbols provided an easy form of identification for the onlooker. By incorporating symbols which were well known and associated with saintly men and women, the Church could use the works of art as teaching metaphors for a more spiritual life. These symbols often related to some aspect of the life of the individual depicted which they would have heard many times in sermons from the local bishop or priest. A palm frond told us that …

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Curator of the Abbey Museum

Curator Interview with Michael Strong

Interview with a Curator

This interview was intended to capture a relatable snapshot of Michael Strong’s life, so that every-day South East Queenslanders (or anyone for that matter!) could find out a little about his humble beginnings, his long connection to the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology and his contagious joie-de-vie and knowledge which he shares generously with whomever he meets. He met me at the door of his home-office,  located in the quiet, sunny suburb of Sandstone Point, just off Bribie Island. He was clearly not the boss of his white hair, and his eyes, which sometimes had a curious sadness, became animated at random as he reminisced with a slight British inflection on the fascinating story of becoming the Curator of the Abbey Museum. 

We began to speak.

Michael, tell me a little about your life and how you became the Curator of the Abbey Museum:

There was a pause

Ahhh? Where do you want to start? he asked. It’s a very complicated story, he joked.

Michael began…

I guess much of my story parallels …

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Picnic at Pemberley

Mr Fitzwilliam Darcy requests the pleasure of your company at A Picnic at Pemberley, in the stunning grounds of the Abbey Museum and Church to partake in an afternoon of elegance and grace.

Bring a picnic lunch or pre-purchase a hamper to enjoy in the gardens. Find amusement in games such as pall-mall, the game of graces, battledore and archery. Then find a partner to dance with on the lawn, Dance Kaleidoscope will assist if you don’t know the dances. Practice your brush strokes with the Church or the gardens as your subject.

For those that are a little more studious, you can learn of the use of herbs and (surprising!) etiquettes of the Regency era.

Afternoon tea will be served at 2:15pm which will include tea, coffee, cool beverages and a range of delicious sandwiches, cakes, biscuits and more.

Our senior curator will be available to answer any questions while you explore the museum. Tour the Abbey Church to see the stunning stained glass windows.

Dance Kaleidoscope will be running a dance workshop at 10:00am if you would …

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Abbey Museum Musketeer stained glass

Musketeer Makeover

After completing the fundraising for the conservation of the medieval and Victorian Stained glass in the Abbey Church and a window of one of the Three Magi above the door to the Abbey Museum, focus has turned to fundraising for the conservation of smaller, but still significant, panels that are currently in the reserve collection.

The first of these is a small but beautifully made panel depicting a Musketeer. This panel dates to the 17th century and probably comes from southern Germany.  I am very happy to announce that funds have now been raised for this window’s conservation. Thank you to everyone who generously donated towards this project or attended one of our special fundraising Trivia Nights dedicated to the stained glass conservation program.

Of course, the most celebrated and romanticised musketeers in history were the famous quartet immortalised by French author Alexandre Dumas whose swashbuckling novel in 1844 was set in the dangerous times for the scheming Cardinal Richelieu and King Louis XIII.

Who were the Musketeers?

Technically, any soldiers armed with …

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Donor King Window in Abbey Museum collection

The “Donor King” has a Name

Visitors to the Abbey Museum may have noticed a stained glass window that was once above the main door has been removed. I can assure you that this is not permanent but just part of the ongoing conservation program of our stained glass windows. This panel depicts a crowned figure holding a covered cup in one hand and a sceptre in the other.  These attributes indicate that it is a king although the identity of the figure was unknown; the catalogue simply records it as “The Donor King” .  However, during conservation of the window new evidence has come to light which is very exciting.  Research has revealed that it was probably part of a much larger window depicting the three Magi (the Three Wise Men or Kings as they are also known) from the Biblical story of the Nativity of Christ.  The window has been badly damaged and conserved a number of times during its history, and sadly the quality of the later work does no justice to the exquisite quality of the original window. Not only is …

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