Glorious Glass at the Abbey Museum

Glorious Glass and the Wormholes of Research by Michael Strong

Join the Abbey Museum Friends for their Annual Luncheon and this fascinating presentation.

The Abbey Museum’s Senior Curator, Michael Strong, will share some of the fascinating research undertaken to identify the stained glass in the Museum Collection prior to the publication of our catalogue. In trying to identify the origins of panels and the history of the heraldic shields Michael has followed leads across the world liaising with international scholars and researchers.

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Trivia Night August

Abbey Trivia Night

Calling all Trivia enthusiasts! Unlock your knowledge, challenge your memory and support the Abbey Museum!

Registration from 6:00pm; questions begin at 6.30pm.

This is a fund-raising evening of fun for all the whole family. Cost $15 per adult; school aged children – free! Enjoy a delicious light supper, lucky door prizes and raffles. All welcome – come with a group or join a group on the night!

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Celts, Art & European Nationalism

Celts, Art & European Nationalism by Dr Dorothy Watts

The ancient Celtic world produced numerous heroes and heroines, but many of these had been largely forgotten over the centuries. From the eighteenth century onward, there was renewed interest in the Celts largely emanating from Great Britain, and extending to those parts of Europe which had a Celtic past. This talk looks at how the various European nations have used figures from their Celtic history, legend and mythology to foster patriotism and national sentiment to the present day.

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Feasting at the Abbey Medieval Banquet

Abbey Medieval Banquet – *CANCELLED

Enjoy an evening of entertainment, mouth-watering delights and an enchanting atmosphere at the Abbey Medieval Banquet.

The evening begins with the traditional ritual of hand washing with scented rosewater. Our Lord Steward will guide you through the manners and customs of medieval banquet dining, while our friendly volunteer servers deliver dishes of medieval food to share.

Under the protection Staraya Ladoga, the guard of our banquet hall, spend the night feasting, drinking and being merry while our dancers, jesters and musicians take you on an unforgettable medieval experience.

View the menu for the 2020 Abbey Medieval Banquet

A wide variety of medieval beverages will be available to purchase at the Banquet Bar. For the more adventurous there are boutiques ales, ciders and mead, non-alcoholic drinks are also available. Please note the event is not BYO.

Tickets available here.

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Guests Feasting at Abbey Medieval Banquet

Abbey Medieval Banquet – *CANCELLED

Enjoy an immersive evening of entertainment, mouth-watering delights and an enchanting atmosphere at the Abbey Medieval Banquet.

The evening of authentic medieval food and entertainment begins with the traditional ritual of hand washing with scented rosewater. Our Lord Steward will guide you through the manners and customs of medieval banquet dining, while our friendly volunteer servers deliver heavenly dishes of medieval food to share.

Under the protection Staraya Ladoga, the guard of our banquet hall, spend the night feasting, drinking and being merry while our dancers, jesters and musicians take you on an adventure into history.

Banquet menu

Following the ceremony of the High Table, the first of 2 removes is served. A remove, or course, consists of several dishes both savoury and sweet. The dishes are placed on platters in the centre of the table and shared between guests. The final course of the evening is called an issue and consists of dried and fresh fruit, nuts and cheese.

View the menu for the 2020 Abbey Medieval Banquet

A wide variety of medieval beverages will be available to …

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Secret Women’s Business: Feminine Hygiene in the Middle Ages – *CANCELLED

By Rosalie Gilbert

We don’t discuss it in polite company, because it’s one of Those Things. It’s not Nice. In fact, it’s a little bit gross. Medieval women faced many challenges like modern women today, some of them quite mundane. Nothing is more mundane than the workings of the woman’s body in her natural cycle, and yet we rarely discuss it. Medieval women faced the same issues with her reproductive organs that women have always faced, and in this talk, Author Rosalie Gilbert gives us the low down on what’s going on low down with the ladies.

 

 

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Friends Presentation - Captain Cook: A Culture of Music and Dance

Captain James Cook: A Culture of Music and Dance

Presented by Dr Heather Clarke

Dr Heather Clarke will reveal the untold story of how Cook used dance to keep his sailors happy and healthy. The role of dance in cultural exchanges when he toured the South Seas, and how Lord Morton influenced these encounters. Discover how the social English country dances of the period reflected Cook’s popularity with the titles: Transit of Venus, Island of Love, South Sea, Omai, and Captain Cook’s Country Dance. Hear how the life and death of the famous navigator were commemorated on the stage.

Dr Heather Blasdale Clarke is a dance researcher, educator and performer, specialising in the history of European dance in eighteenth and nineteenth century colonial Australia.

 

ONLINE SALES HAVE NOW CLOSED. TICKETS CAN STILL BE PURCHASED AT  THE DOOR.

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Regency at the Abbey Museum

Regency treasures at the Abbey Museum

A fashion plate is an illustration or picture of the latest fashions of the time and were published in women’s journals throughout the Regency era.  The Lady’s Magazine was one such journal and one of the first to include hand-coloured and engraved fashion plates in its publications. First published in 1770 the Lady’s Magazine was one of the leading periodicals of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. The magazine included:

short stories and poetry essays praising the ‘female virtues” of decorum and modesty advice for wives and mothers information on fashion (fashion plates) recipes medicinal ‘receipts’ offering cures for illnesses from cramp to ‘hectic fevers’ biographies of famous historical and contemporary figures domestic and foreign news

Although the Abbey Museum does not have full copies of the Lady’s Magazine, it does have an extensive collection of the fashion plates and fans which span 1773 to 1902.

This is known as the Regency era when the Prince Regent (Prince of Wales) ruled the United Kingdom because his father, King …

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Stone Age Family Fun week

Learn Stone Age history at Abbey Museum

Meet Ugg, our Stone Age hero from Skara Brae.

The Stone Age period, or neolithic era, was very significant time in man’s evolution as this was the period in history when man first started using technology.  When we say technology,  we don’t mean items such as Ipads, or drones or sat navs of course.  Instead, by technology we mean basic implements that we might probably under estimate today.  These implements or technology helped to provide solutions to problems. The problems that Stone Age people encountered were slightly different to problems that we encounter today, however, this type of technology  became vital to man’s survival and  progression and included rocks, sticks, string and bone. We’d like to introduce you to Ugg, who lived in a beautiful stone age village known as  Skara Brae, located in Scotland’s Orkney Islands a long, long time ago.  Approximately 3000BC!

Ugg very clever! Ugg make string from flax. String not big thing today. Modern man have duct tape, who need string? String big step for man. String tie two things together. String tie pointy thing to …

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Abbey Museum Jewellery

How Ornaments Make us Human

On Saturday 4th August Dr Michelle Langley entertained thirty Museum Friends and their guests with her fascinating presentation on jewellery – “bling” – over the millennia. Dr Langley is the DECRA (Discovery Early Career Researcher Award) Research Fellow at Griffith University; her special area of study is Sulawesi, Timor-Leste and Australia.

Dr Langley’s illustrated presentation described how humans have used personal ornamentation as far back as Neanderthal times and how this could be shown as a manner of differentiating humans from animals. She explained how cave paintings depicted people with various types of ornamentation and how this archaeological evidence provides insights into how some of these ornaments were made.

In addition to the pictorial evidence there is a wealth of recently discovered archaeological evidence of ornamentation found in burials and sites of early human occupation, especially in Indonesia, Timor-Leste and Australia. Analysis of these recent discoveries is showing that the belief in the capacity of our ancestors for language, art, complex technologies and social behaviour only developed after they reached Europe approximately 40,000 years ago is incorrect. …

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