Regency at the Abbey Museum

Regency treasures at the Abbey Museum

A fashion plate is an illustration or picture of the latest fashions of the time and were published in women’s journals throughout the Regency era.  The Lady’s Magazine was one such journal and one of the first to include hand-coloured and engraved fashion plates in its publications. First published in 1770 the Lady’s Magazine was one of the leading periodicals of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. The magazine included:

short stories and poetry essays praising the ‘female virtues” of decorum and modesty advice for wives and mothers information on fashion (fashion plates) recipes medicinal ‘receipts’ offering cures for illnesses from cramp to ‘hectic fevers’ biographies of famous historical and contemporary figures domestic and foreign news

Although the Abbey Museum does not have full copies of the Lady’s Magazine, it does have an extensive collection of the fashion plates and fans which span 1773 to 1902.

This is known as the Regency era when the Prince Regent (Prince of Wales) ruled the United Kingdom because his father, King …

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Young Woman with a Stylus

Wax Tablets Roman Style

Wax Tablets….. the Roman Way!

What was your favourite excuse for not handing in your homework? Did the dog ever eat it?  Perhaps your kids have come up with some creative reasons as to why assignments were overdue! I seem to recall ‘the wind blew it away’ or ‘a glass of juice spilled on it’.  We have all heard a few good ones but in ancient Rome,  students had an even better excuse! Their homework had melted by the sun! (Sometimes assisted by holding their wax tablets close to their body).  Now that’s a good one!

Wax tablets and stylus was the means of writing at that time. Paper did not become readily and cheaply available in Europe until the Middle Ages. So, it was necessary to have an effective means for keeping lists, general correspondence and legal documents.  The wax tablet was used as the everyday notebook for thousands of years, although there is increasing evidence that ink was used on thin sheets of wood also.  A number of these have been found at Vindolanda, a Roman Army …

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Cuneiform text

From Clay Tablets to Digital Tablets

The Reed Stylus and Clay Tablet

From clay tablets to digital tablets.  Today texting, typing, writing, memes, … there are so  many ways in which we communicate with others;  technology has opened a veritable Pandora’s box of possibilities. Communications have become shorter and more frequent, full of the expectation of an immediate response.  The result is our modern world seems to travel at break-neck speed.  It is hard to imagine what it was like at the beginning of recorded time when humankind first put pen to paper… well, actually not paper — or pen for that matter — but a reed stylus to clay tablet.

Clay Tablet with Cuneiform

As you may be aware, one of the earliest forms of writing is called Cuneiform. Cuneiform is thought to have been first developed by the Sumerians of ancient Mesopotamia c 3500 – 3000 BC. Mesopotamian scribes recorded everything from daily events such as trade records and sales dockets to astronomical happenings and political events. I was surprised to learn that some tablets inscribed with cuneiform were written in several different languages …

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A Medieval Christmas

A Medieval Christmas – An Evening of Gregorian Chanting

<<<< THIS EVENT IS NOW SOLD OUT >>>>

As the Christmas Season approaches, we wonder how to create those special, everlasting moments and memories..

 

Wonder no more – The Abbey Museum has you covered!

This Holiday Season, the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology is inviting you join in a captivating evening of Gregorian Chanting!

On Saturday the 26th November, starting at 6.30pm, you are invited to surround yourself in the soft candlelit ambience of the Abbey Church and listen to the breathtaking sounds of Schola Cantorum and their incredible Gregorian Chanting. Excite your senses as this wonderful group transports you back in time, before the advent of ‘amplifiers’ and ‘sound mixers’.

At the conclusion of the performance in the Church, Guests are invited to the Abbey Hall to enjoy a sumptuous light supper of Medieval Christmas delicacies!

 

Tickets cost: $30.00 per person!

Tickets are …

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