Intact 1st - 3rd century Roman Glass Flask found in Turkey

Abbey Roman Flask – still in one piece after 2,000 years.

Among the Abbey Museum’s more recent acquisitions is a collection of forty-four objects from Turkey, Tunisia and Papua New Guinea including an amazing intact Roman glass flask. It is incredible to have such a fragile object in our collection, considering it was used by someone when togas were all the fashion and attending chariot races or watching gladiatorial battles were on the top of the entertainment list.

Our very fine large bulbous flask in green-yellow glass originated in the Roman Imperial Period and dates somewhere between the 1st and 3rd Century AD. Now to get a little technical – the flask has a slightly retracted base and long thin cylindrical neck ending in a solid rim with a rounded lip and flaring mouth. It was blown to a very fine standard and has this beautiful iridescent weathering and lime encrustation.

Intact 1st to 3rd century Roman Flask

The glass in our flask has iridescence where it has oxidised. This is a good sign as it indicates that this flask had been underground for much of the time …

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lacquerware bowl in Abbey Museum Collection

Before Tupperware there was Lacquerware

Lacquerware at the Abbey Museum

One of the wonderful things about working with the Abbey Museum’s collection is exploring the mysteries of the diverse range of artefacts. My latest research involved the small but fine collection of lacquerware acquired by John Ward when he was living in Burma in 1914 – 1915.

I discovered that lacquerware has been a cultural industry of Burma (Myanmar) for the last three centuries. Because it is light, waterproof, easily moulded and dries to a hard state it has a multitude of uses.

It was used in Buddhist and ceremonial rituals as well as in everyday life of Burmese people at all levels of society. In homes it was the Tupperware of the time, used to store food, clothing, cosmetics, flowers and betel nut. However in temples and palaces the privileged used lacquer boxes to store jewels, letters, and sacred Buddhist manuscripts.

Burmese Lacquerware Treasured

Burmese lacquerware is made …

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