Rediscovering the Lost Empire of the ancient Hittites

Rediscovering the Lost Empire of the Ancient Hittites

This presentation on April 21st 2018, presented by The University of Queensland’s Hittitologist Prof. Trevor Bryce, will investigate how, through archaeological evidence and language dicipherment, historians are beginning to understand this lost civilisation.  The ancient Hittites Empire once spanned from Turkey’s western coast to the Euphrates river and south through Syria onto the Damscus borders.  However, we have known little about this civilisation until the last 140 years.  The purpose of the event is to engage with Friends’ members and visitors through an educative presentation.  The presentation begins at 2.00pm and is followed with questions and afternoon tea, concluding around 4.00pm.

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Grant to Assist Build of new Joust Arena

Celebrating Festival Funding

There was great cause for celebrations recently at the Abbey Museum when we were advised of the successful applications for not just one but two important funding grants to assist in planning and hosting the Abbey Medieval Festival.

Funding From TEQ

The first, from Tourism and Events Queensland (TEQ) is to support marketing for the Abbey Medieval Festival throughout Queensland and interstate.  TEQ has been a long standing supporter of our Festival and of the region in general and this funding will enable us to:

employ specialised graphic personnel to design engaging graphics and Festival images; employ specialised video personnel to create video clips to promote the Festival online; have a much-needed refresh of the festival website with supporting SEO (Search Engine Optimization) and social media campaigns the funds might also stretch to assist us partially in a new billboard campaign

These funds are vital to help us retain our cutting edge in a busy and competitive tourism environment and to enable us to attract as wide an audience as possible.

Stronger Communities Program Funding

The second, from the …

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Favourite things of the Abbey Museum

These are a few of our favourite things

By Jan Nargar

Most of us know that the Abbey Museum has some special items in their collection – but what do you really know about it and do you have a favourite thing?

Have you ever walked through the museum and a special object has caught your eye?  What was it?  Where did it come from?  What story does it have to tell? As staff, it happens to us all the time! Not to mention the Collection Management Team that meets regularly to research and catalogue the Museum’s artefacts – there has been lots of discusion about favourite objects. Each member of the team has particular favourites. Having so many incredible artefacts in the collection we are spoiled for choice.  So, listed below are a few of our our favourite things!

Guess whose favourite thing?

A tiny Chinese snuff bottle with a painting on the inside!  Truly! A beautiful painting of a crane in a landscape scene delicately painted inside the bottle. It is in Museum Case 26. How was that …

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Kids Dig It! Viking Family Fun

Viking fun – Abbey Museum style!
Come in Costume!
Expect to meet a Viking!
Learn at the Viking Masterclass!
Find out about Lucet weaving, Naal binding and more!
Choose from some of the old favourites (such as archery and the archaeological digs) and some brand new and never offered before! . Mark your calendar for ‘Kids Dig it!’’ Viking Family Fun Week – January 8-12th 2018!

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Trivia Night Fundraising for stained glass

Trivia ‘Fun’draising at the Abbey Museum

Trivia at the Abbey Museum – it’s here to stay!

Trivia Night at the Abbey Museum has been held regularly for a few years and historically we have always had similar numbers of players attend. Now, our reputation for providing an entertaining evening and fantastic supper has reached a wider audience, making our recent November trivia night the most successful to date! And did we have fun?!

Need more chairs!

It was fantastic to see so many tickets purchased online and twenty-one adults and seven children took advantage of this, so we arranged a couple of tables additional to our usual number to accommodate them.  This was great, however we were in for a surprise and did not anticipate the large number of people who paid at the door.  In fact, we had to find extra tables and chairs to seat them. What a great problem to have!

On the night there were thirteen teams (over seventy people) vying for Trivia supremacy. Competition and rivalry was keen, and nobody wanted to be outdone! Fortunately there was plenty of supper …

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Gregorian Chant

Medieval Christmas – SOLD OUT!

A mystical Christmas evening where the ancient sound of Latin melodies are just the beginning of your Yuletide experience. Allow your  spirit to travel back to yesteryear, lulled by the eerie sounds of ‘Schola Cantorum’s lonely Gregorian chant.  Be entranced by the magical dusk-light flickering through the stained glass windows highlighting the quaint surroundings of the Abbey Church.  Arrive around 5.45pm to allow time to visit the museum and view the collection of medieval manuscripts on display in the manuscript gallery. Don’t miss an opportunity to visit the museum shoppe to browse the wonderful array of  unique gifts and souvenirs for those ‘difficult-to-pick’ Christmas gifts. The chant begins at the Church at 6.30pm,  followed by a medieval themed supper of traditional Christmas food and gingerbread at the Abbey Hall.  (Parking at the rear of the museum).  This event has limited numbers and sells out quickly, so book your tickets below.

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Abbey Museum Stained Glass Tours - medieval shield

Gregorian Peace at the Abbey Museum

Gregorian Chanting – take a breather this Advent

Close your eyes and be transported back to the Middle Ages where monks in hooded robes chant their divine offices in the candle lit sanctuary of a Church.  This is not a scene from centuries past, but instead the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology in Caboolture, brings the past to you in the form of Gregorian Chanting!

Traditionally, Gregorian chants were sung by choirs of in churches or by religious orders in their chapels.  Named for Pope Gregory I (Pope 590 – 604), chanting has been part of Christian religious services since the very early days of the Catholic Church. The ambiance is magically re-created in the candlelit Abbey Church with ‘Schola Cantorum’ of Brisbane each Christams. The Gregorian Christmas chanting which signifies the beginning of Advent and the onset of what some might call the ‘silly season’ instead brings a piece of peace to your heart and soul, a much sought after reprieve from our busy lives.

A Christmas Tradition

The Medieval Christmas event has been a well-loved event …

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Cuneiform Tablet

Cuneiform Expert Visits Abbey Museum

A standing room only audience accepted the invitation to hear Professor Wayne Horowitz speak on the lost Jewish communities in ancient Babylonia on Tuesday 19 September . Professor Horowitz is a Professor of Assyriology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and was here working on the Cuneiform Project Australia and New Zealand. This project aims to identify and publish all the cuneiform artefacts in Australian and New Zealand collections. Dr Horowitz has been examining 10 such objects in the Abbey Museum’s Middle East collection.

In his presentation Professor Horowitz spoke of the commencement of the Jewish Diaspora when the population was transported to Babylonia following the sacking of Jerusalem. The Jewish people spent 2500 years in exile in Babylonia. His colleague and research assistant, Peter Zilberg, completed the evening with his talk titled “Ezekiel and the Grand Canal of Babylon”. Mr Zilberg explained how information gleaned from cuneiform tablets have added to our knowledge of the Jewish nation in captivity. In an enthusiastic and energetic presentation he showed how seemingly mundane items recorded on cuneiform tablets tied in to biblical …

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Cuneiform text

From Clay Tablets to Digital Tablets

The Reed Stylus and Clay Tablet

From clay tablets to digital tablets.  Today texting, typing, writing, memes, … there are so  many ways in which we communicate with others;  technology has opened a veritable Pandora’s box of possibilities. Communications have become shorter and more frequent, full of the expectation of an immediate response.  The result is our modern world seems to travel at break-neck speed.  It is hard to imagine what it was like at the beginning of recorded time when humankind first put pen to paper… well, actually not paper — or pen for that matter — but a reed stylus to clay tablet.

Clay Tablet with Cuneiform

As you may be aware, one of the earliest forms of writing is called Cuneiform. Cuneiform is thought to have been first developed by the Sumerians of ancient Mesopotamia c 3500 – 3000 BC. Mesopotamian scribes recorded everything from daily events such as trade records and sales dockets to astronomical happenings and political events. I was surprised to learn that some tablets inscribed with cuneiform were written in several different languages …

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Her Breath Smelt of Mint and Myrrh – Floor Talk

THE ABBEY MUSEUM OF ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY PRESENTS:

Her Breath Smelt of Mint and Myrrh

How do the modern standards of beauty compare to those of the Middle Ages? Does your daily beauty routine measure up? Join the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology for a myth-busting and sweet-smelling Floor Talk that explores the perfumes, scented cosmetics, mouthwashes and hygiene products of the Middle Ages.

The Abbey Museum’s own Education Manager, Mr Damien Fegan not only busts the myth that the people of the Middle Ages smelt terrible and all had rotten teeth, but presents the argument that the beauty products of the Middle Ages aren’t actually that far removed from those of modern times! In fact: did you know that there is not a single beauty product on the market today that did not have a Middle Ages equivalent?

We’ve had minty breath for hundreds of years!

DATE: Saturday 5th August

TIME: 2.00pm Start

PLACE: Abbey Museum Hall at the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology

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