Kids Dig It! Viking Family Fun

Viking fun – Abbey Museum style!
Come in Costume!
Expect to meet a Viking!
Learn at the Viking Masterclass!
Find out about Lucet weaving, Naal binding and more!
Choose from some of the old favourites (such as archery and the archaeological digs) and some brand new and never offered before! . Mark your calendar for ‘Kids Dig it!’’ Viking Family Fun Week – January 8-12th 2018!

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Gregorian Chant

Medieval Christmas – SOLD OUT!

A mystical Christmas evening where the ancient sound of Latin melodies are just the beginning of your Yuletide experience. Allow your  spirit to travel back to yesteryear, lulled by the eerie sounds of ‘Schola Cantorum’s lonely Gregorian chant.  Be entranced by the magical dusk-light flickering through the stained glass windows highlighting the quaint surroundings of the Abbey Church.  Arrive around 5.45pm to allow time to visit the museum and view the collection of medieval manuscripts on display in the manuscript gallery. Don’t miss an opportunity to visit the museum shoppe to browse the wonderful array of  unique gifts and souvenirs for those ‘difficult-to-pick’ Christmas gifts. The chant begins at the Church at 6.30pm,  followed by a medieval themed supper of traditional Christmas food and gingerbread at the Abbey Hall.  (Parking at the rear of the museum).  This event has limited numbers and sells out quickly, so book your tickets below.

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Gregorian Peace at the Abbey Museum

Gregorian Chanting – take a breather this Advent

Close your eyes and be transported back to the Middle Ages where monks in hooded robes chant their divine offices in the candle lit sanctuary of a Church.  This is not a scene from centuries past, but instead the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology in Caboolture, brings the past to you in the form of Gregorian Chanting!

Traditionally, Gregorian chants were sung by choirs of in churches or by religious orders in their chapels.  Named for Pope Gregory I (Pope 590 – 604), chanting has been part of Christian religious services since the very early days of the Catholic Church. The ambiance is magically re-created in the candlelit Abbey Church with ‘Schola Cantorum’ of Brisbane each Christams. The Gregorian Christmas chanting which signifies the beginning of Advent and the onset of what some might call the ‘silly season’ instead brings a piece of peace to your heart and soul, a much sought after reprieve from our busy lives.

A Christmas Tradition

The Medieval Christmas event has been a well-loved event …

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Cuneiform Experts from Jerusalem visit Abbey Museum

Cuneiform Expert Visits Abbey Museum

A standing room only audience accepted the invitation to hear Professor Wayne Horowitz speak on the lost Jewish communities in ancient Babylonia on Tuesday 19 September . Professor Horowitz is a Professor of Assyriology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and was here working on the Cuneiform Project Australia and New Zealand. This project aims to identify and publish all the cuneiform artefacts in Australian and New Zealand collections. Dr Horowitz has been examining 10 such objects in the Abbey Museum’s Middle East collection.

In his presentation Professor Horowitz spoke of the commencement of the Jewish Diaspora when the population was transported to Babylonia following the sacking of Jerusalem. The Jewish people spent 2500 years in exile in Babylonia. His colleague and research assistant, Peter Zilberg, completed the evening with his talk titled “Ezekiel and the Grand Canal of Babylon”. Mr Zilberg explained how information gleaned from cuneiform tablets have added to our knowledge of the Jewish nation in captivity. In an enthusiastic and energetic presentation he showed how seemingly mundane items recorded on cuneiform tablets tied in to biblical …

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Cuneiform text

From Clay Tablets to Digital Tablets

The Reed Stylus and Clay Tablet

From clay tablets to digital tablets.  Today texting, typing, writing, memes, … there are so  many ways in which we communicate with others;  technology has opened a veritable Pandora’s box of possibilities. Communications have become shorter and more frequent, full of the expectation of an immediate response.  The result is our modern world seems to travel at break-neck speed.  It is hard to imagine what it was like at the beginning of recorded time when humankind first put pen to paper… well, actually not paper — or pen for that matter — but a reed stylus to clay tablet.

Clay Tablet with Cuneiform

As you may be aware, one of the earliest forms of writing is called Cuneiform. Cuneiform is thought to have been first developed by the Sumerians of ancient Mesopotamia c 3500 – 3000 BC. Mesopotamian scribes recorded everything from daily events such as trade records and sales dockets to astronomical happenings and political events. I was surprised to learn that some tablets inscribed with cuneiform were written in several different languages …

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Her Breath Smelt of Mint and Myrrh – Floor Talk

THE ABBEY MUSEUM OF ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY PRESENTS:

Her Breath Smelt of Mint and Myrrh

How do the modern standards of beauty compare to those of the Middle Ages? Does your daily beauty routine measure up? Join the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology for a myth-busting and sweet-smelling Floor Talk that explores the perfumes, scented cosmetics, mouthwashes and hygiene products of the Middle Ages.

The Abbey Museum’s own Education Manager, Mr Damien Fegan not only busts the myth that the people of the Middle Ages smelt terrible and all had rotten teeth, but presents the argument that the beauty products of the Middle Ages aren’t actually that far removed from those of modern times! In fact: did you know that there is not a single beauty product on the market today that did not have a Middle Ages equivalent?

We’ve had minty breath for hundreds of years!

DATE: Saturday 5th August

TIME: 2.00pm Start

PLACE: Abbey Museum Hall at the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology

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picnic

A Picnic at Pemberley – Recreating the Regency Period.

The Regency Period – a great artistic era or a bad royal joke?

The Regency Period was a  period of nine years, starting in 1811 when a bill was passed declaring that King George III was too unfit to rule, naming his 48-year-old son, the future King George IV, as Prince Regent. While the actual regency only lasted until the death of the King in 1820, the entire Regency Era is generally thought to be from the 1780’s until George IV’s death in 1830. However, the bill was made with reluctance as the Prince Regent was extremely unpopular. He was discouraged from making decisions regarding official governing business and war, so he instead spent all the money from the treasury on things such as balls, fashion, food, and pageants!  People did not view him as the ‘Great King’ they originally had hoped he would be, and by the time of his official coronation in 1821, he had become a symbol for senseless extravagance and a national joke.

A great period of change

But although the Prince Regent was a disliked person …

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Abbey Museum Joust

Horsing Around – a great Joust

One of the favourite activities at the Medieval Festival is the jousting tournament. What is not to love about knights in armour, galloping steeds dressed in the colours of their riders, lances and cheering crowds? If you cannot get enough of this spectacle, or you are a volunteer and cannot get to see it at the festival itself, fear not! For the first time this year a Friday afternoon joust will take place at the festival jousting arena commencing at 1.30pm.

You will be able to see all ten jousters participating in this premier event of the festival – taking approximately one hour. We plan to show off eight Australian jousters and two internationals (including a French Knight). Limited seating is available and tickets must be pre-purchased online; no tickets will be available for purchase on that day or at the event.

Food and drinks will be available for purchase throughout the afternoon. Book online now!

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To Hell and Back – Floor Talk

THE ABBEY MUSEUM OF ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY PRESENTS:

To hell and back again in the Anatolian Bronze Age

Get ready to travel back in time! Imagine that the year is 1200BC; the Late Bronze Age civilisations of the Mediterranean world are collapsing! What is causing this collapse? An invasion from Europe? Famine? Climate Catastrophes? Civil Wars? A Zombie Outbreak!? All these and more (yes, even the zombies!) have all been cited as responsible for this extreme cultural uproar!

Join the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology and guest speaker Mr. Andrew Fairbairn, and explore the rise and fall of cultures from the civilisational collapse that heralded the end of the Early Bronze Age world including that of the Hittite Empire, based in the highlands of central Turkey.

Guest Lecturer, Mr Andrew Fairbairn, is not only an esteemed archaeobotanist, but is an Associate Professor and Australian Research Council Future Fellow in Archaeology at The University of Queensland. Mr Fairbairn is a co-director of the Boncuklu excavation project in Turkey and is currently researching the development …

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Tell Halaf and the Cradle Of Civilization Floor Talk + Special Artefact Display

Tell Halaf and the Cradle Of Civilization

It was while travelling through Syria trying to find the best route for the proposed Baghdad railways that a bizarre tale of stone statues in the form of human-animal hybrids came to the ears of Max von Oppenheim, attaché to the German embassy in Cairo and scholar in his own right. Oppenheim, a keen amateur archaeologist was intrigued by these rumours and started to investigate the site which would become famous as Tell Halaf.

In this talk, retired archaeologist, Vera Windau Heath, will take us on a journey back to the cradle of civilization and the remarkable story of the people who built this intriguing city. Vera will also share her personal experience of visiting and excavating this historic site and the secrets it continues to reveal to archaeologists.

Join us for afternoon tea following the talk as well!

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