picnic

A Picnic at Pemberley – Recreating the Regency Period.

The Regency Period – a great artistic era or a bad royal joke?

The Regency Period was a  period of nine years, starting in 1811 when a bill was passed declaring that King George III was too unfit to rule, naming his 48-year-old son, the future King George IV, as Prince Regent. While the actual regency only lasted until the death of the King in 1820, the entire Regency Era is generally thought to be from the 1780’s until George IV’s death in 1830. However, the bill was made with reluctance as the Prince Regent was extremely unpopular. He was discouraged from making decisions regarding official governing business and war, so he instead spent all the money from the treasury on things such as balls, fashion, food, and pageants!  People did not view him as the ‘Great King’ they originally had hoped he would be, and by the time of his official coronation in 1821, he had become a symbol for senseless extravagance and a national joke.

A great period of change

But although the Prince Regent was a disliked person …

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Teaching the Value of Archaeology

To many people archaeology embodies adventure, excitement, very old things and, of course, thanks to the Indiana Jones franchise, unfortunately Nazis. The image of Indiana Jones, Hollywood’s archetypal archaeologist, has been burned into the minds of the “baby boomer” generation. These days, finding anyone under the age of 20 who has seen these films is an adventure in itself. Archaeology is so much more than “digging up old stuff” and putting it into a museum; it plays an important role in society, more than most people realise. Instilling that idea into a student’s mind is a definite challenge.

Curiosity plays an important role in the public perception of archaeology and history. Why are people so fascinated by King Tut and the Pyramids? It has to be more than, “they look pretty cool” right? Well, that’s because it is. Human beings have a natural desire to know more about where they have come from, especially if it relates to themselves. There is no doubt that there is economic value associated with archaeology as well. Museums all over the world are …

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Dr Geoff Ginn talks about the Abbey Museum history

A Morning out of the Museum Office

The Moreton Bay History Seminar was held at North lakes Community Centre on 11th May 2017 as part of the National Trust sponsored Australian Heritage Festival. A number of Abbey Museum staff and volunteers attended and were especially keen to hear the second speaker, Dr Geoff Ginn, who spoke about the history of the Abbey Museum and its founder J.S.M Ward.

The morning consisted of three speakers on very diverse subjects – but all related  in one way or another to the local region.

The first speaker, Dr Regina Ganter, professor of Australian History at Griffith University, spoke of the missions at Zion Hill and Stradbroke Island. Her talk examined the social experiment that these missions represented and why they both failed to achieve the results that were initially expected of them. In discussing the difficulties encountered by the missionaries, Dr Ganter touched on the expectations placed on them by their home societies, as well as local issues which affected their efforts.

Dr Geoffrey Ginn, Senior Lecturer in History at the University …

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Tell Halaf Talk

Tell All – Tell Halaf

What do Agatha Christie, Lawrence of Arabia, Max von Oppenheim and donors to the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology have in common? The packed audience at Vera Windau-Heath’s talk on Saturday 18th March heard the answers to these and many other fascinating facts about archaeological digs in Syria.

Archaeology in Syria

Vera and her husband Ken were part of teams undertaking digs at Tell Halaf in Syria. Vera’s passion for the country and the local inhabitants (they came to befriend) was obvious from the tenor of her description of the numerous cultural issues they confronted. Tell Halaf was a major settlement in the fertile valley of the Khabur River from the Halafian period 6000- 5000 BC through Summerian, Babylonian, Assyrian, Aramean and Persian periods. Max von Oppenheim first undertook excavation at the site during 1911 – 1913 where settlements dating back to the Chalcolithic period were revealed. Vera explained how von Oppenheim had to transport all his tools and equipment from Aleppo to the dig site at Tell Halaf by camel – a journey that took 20 days!

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Antique, Vintage or Just Plain Old?

One Man’s Trash is Another Man’s Treasure

Indeed this statement is so true! Have you ever heard the stories of the families that had a special item at home that they were absolutely SURE would make them an overnight millionaire because it belonged to great-grandmother Betty who said it was a special antique family heirloom?

Well great-grandmother Betty had told grandmother Mary, who told her daughter Amy, who then told her niece Natalie it was special and had been in the family for generations. Natalie then took it to be appraised and discovered (to her horror) that it was indeed in their family for generations, but was worth absolutely nothing apart from the knowledge it was special.

So how do you know that your old family antiques are actually antiques and not just… old?

What is an Antique?

Today everything seems to be called an antique!

Generally speaking, an antique is any work of art, piece …

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hamper

Picnic Hampers at Pemberley

The perfect accompainment to the Picnic at Pemberley;

A delicious pre-made Picnic Hamper!

We all love the amazing treats served for afternoon-tea at our Pemberley event, but this year you can  indulge in a true “Picnic” at Pemberley. Why not treat yourself to a hamper full of Regency inspired food, that is packed and ready for your culinary delight?  Whether you choose to be seated on a rug, or at one of the tables to enjoy your lunch, we are sure you will appreciate feasting on the treats inside your hamper, while absorbing the Regency atmosphere created throughout the grounds of the stunning Abbey Church and Museum. Picnic Hampers can be ordered online at a cost of $25, and can be picked up when our gates open on the day, at 11:30am.

Hampers will include a range of Regency inspired goodies such as:

Red or White Wine, and Regency Cordial for Children.

Chelsea Bun or Gluten free cake.

Quiche …

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Order of the Horse – Pemberley 2016

Horses, Cavalry, Guns and Uniforms

The backdrop set in the time of the famous Napoleonic Wars in the early 1900s in Regency style.

A time where women paraded around in regency dress and gentleman courted, escorted and swept ladies off their feet. When men were adorned in French or Anglo uniform and women worshiped their male heroes of war.

Picnic at Pemberley transports us to a time of grace where women were dressed in beautiful gowns and men a like, a time when military men of the cavalry were admired with awe. Their horses and uniforms breath taking. At Picnic of Pemberley, a small unit of heavy French Cavalry serving the Emperor Napoleon arrive at the Picnic on their horses. Women and men eye off the cavalry and their horses as they enter as guests. An armoured Cuirassier officer of the cavalry, appointed by the Emperor Napoleon, and Dragoons, display a beautiful drill on their horses in full uniform followed by …

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Abbey Museum Celebrates 30 Years

Thirty years ago on a warm Saturday afternoon in late June a group of friends, members of the Abbey Community, builders and museum staff gathered with over 100 invited guests  to hear the Abbey Museum declared officially open. It was a moving moment: the culmination of more than six years of research, design and fund raising.

There were times when it seemed that the modest design for the gallery would run out of funds and remain an empty shell. Despite the nightmares, remarkably money always came just in time to pay the bills. The Museum team became incredibly inventive in attracting funds and in-kind gifts of materials. At one stage the deputy director of the Queensland Museum (itself nearing completion) remarked to Michael Strong that there were more members of his staff working as volunteers at the Abbey Museum than there were at South Brisbane! Most of the case designs were done with the help of David Bligh and Robert Allen, two senior design artists at the Queensland Museum, and they relished the task of designing a museum without strictures …

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Delftware Plate from Abbey Museum Collection

Dutch Delft – Almost as Famous as Clogs!

Situated in the Museum’s ‘Apothecary Shoppe’ display, can be found several items of iconic blue and white Dutch Delft pottery. Careful research has uncovered some interesting history to share from the examples that we have in our collection. Delft on display

Research has been carried out on three of our Dutch Delft items.  One is an attractive plate with sprays of flowers (1739-1750) and another is a fruit (or strawberry) strainer dish (c.1725-1775) that usually pairs with a matching plate on a table to catch the moisture from strawberries or other soft fruits. The third item is a 17th century Delft tile with an endearing depiction of a mother and child.

In the case of our plate and fruit strainer dish we are fortunate to have evidence of the factory mark on their reverse side. The axe mark shows that both of these items were produced at the earthenware factory, De Porceleyn Bijl (The Porcelain Axe) whose workshop was active from 1657 to 1803.

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Post card of Conway castle in the Abbey Museum Collection

Why Postcards?

Throughout his entire life the Reverend JSM Ward, founder of the collection at the Abbey Museum of Art & Archaeology, was driven by a desire to understand the evolution of humankind. He amassed some 90,000 objects which provide brief glimpses into the lives of cultures and civilizations long past. While most of his collection were objects used by people, Ward also brought together a contemporary collection of postcards. Luckily for us postcards are easily transportable, deftly stored and mostly have little value and therefore are unlikely to be on top of an asset list. Postcards often remain with collectors longer than more valuable objects might in times of financial hardship.

Ward’s postcard collection includes images of archaeological and historical sites, tourist attractions, spiritually meaningful places and culturally distinctive snapshots of people, events and lifestyles from about the late 1800s until his death in 1949. While they are positioned mostly outside the usual collection policy of the Museum, we have included these as part of the Ward memorabilia section. For many months now, I have been assiduously sorting them and slowly …

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