Abbey Museum Friends Bunyip trip

The Great Bunyip Hunt of 2017

Are you familiar with ghoulies and ghosties and long legged beasties and things that go bump in the night – like maybe a bunyip?

The bunyip is a large mythical creature from Australian Aboriginal mythology, said to lurk in swamps, billabongs, creeks, riverbeds, and waterholes. The origin of the word bunyip has been traced to the Wemba-Wemba or Wergaia language of Aboriginal people of South-Eastern Australia.

On 2nd-3rd October the Abbey Museum Friends are organising a two day coach trip, Finding the Bunyip, which will take us to many places around the Scenic Rim where bunyips may well lurk. Along the way the Museum’s Senior Curator, Michael Strong, will explain the historical significance of the various sites and their importance to the Aboriginal people of the area.

We will be staying overnight at Beaudesert  and taking the opportunity to visit the Beaudesert Historical Museum. We will visit many places of significance – bora rings, lagoons, caves and natural features – hearing the dreaming stories along the way.

Cost will be $180 per person which covers bed …

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Abbey Museum Volunteer receives acknowledgement

If You Hang Around Long Enough

Our very good friend Maurice O’Connell (that is “o apostrophe c,o,n,n,e,l,l” as one local business noted on his membership card) was recently honoured at the Longman Volunteer Awards.

These awards are given during National Volunteer Week to honour volunteers in various categories for their service to an organisation within each Federal electorate. Under the category Arts and Culture, Maurice was honoured for his long and dedicated service to the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology.  He has been a volunteer at the Museum for over 20 years. During that time you may have met him:

taking visitors on a tour of the stained glass windows in the Abbey Church running an educational dig for a class of school students spruiking at the Medieval Festival acting as Master of Ceremonies at the Picnic at Pemberley keeping a photographic record of some Museum activities assisting with activities during Family Fun Weeks driving the tractor to replace the sand in the archaeological digs

Congratulations Maurice – lovely to see your dedication appreciated by a wider …

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Dr Geoff Ginn talks about the Abbey Museum history

A Morning out of the Museum Office

The Moreton Bay History Seminar was held at North lakes Community Centre on 11th May 2017 as part of the National Trust sponsored Australian Heritage Festival. A number of Abbey Museum staff and volunteers attended and were especially keen to hear the second speaker, Dr Geoff Ginn, who spoke about the history of the Abbey Museum and its founder J.S.M Ward.

The morning consisted of three speakers on very diverse subjects – but all related  in one way or another to the local region.

The first speaker, Dr Regina Ganter, professor of Australian History at Griffith University, spoke of the missions at Zion Hill and Stradbroke Island. Her talk examined the social experiment that these missions represented and why they both failed to achieve the results that were initially expected of them. In discussing the difficulties encountered by the missionaries, Dr Ganter touched on the expectations placed on them by their home societies, as well as local issues which affected their efforts.

Dr Geoffrey Ginn, Senior Lecturer in History at the University …

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Abbey Museum Joust

Horsing Around – a great Joust

One of the favourite activities at the Medieval Festival is the jousting tournament. What is not to love about knights in armour, galloping steeds dressed in the colours of their riders, lances and cheering crowds? If you cannot get enough of this spectacle, or you are a volunteer and cannot get to see it at the festival itself, fear not! For the first time this year a Friday afternoon joust will take place at the festival jousting arena commencing at 1.30pm.

You will be able to see all ten jousters participating in this premier event of the festival – taking approximately one hour. We plan to show off eight Australian jousters and two internationals (including a French Knight). Limited seating is available and tickets must be pre-purchased online; no tickets will be available for purchase on that day or at the event.

Food and drinks will be available for purchase throughout the afternoon. Book online now!

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Tell Halaf Talk

Tell All – Tell Halaf

What do Agatha Christie, Lawrence of Arabia, Max von Oppenheim and donors to the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology have in common? The packed audience at Vera Windau-Heath’s talk on Saturday 18th March heard the answers to these and many other fascinating facts about archaeological digs in Syria.

Archaeology in Syria

Vera and her husband Ken were part of teams undertaking digs at Tell Halaf in Syria. Vera’s passion for the country and the local inhabitants (they came to befriend) was obvious from the tenor of her description of the numerous cultural issues they confronted. Tell Halaf was a major settlement in the fertile valley of the Khabur River from the Halafian period 6000- 5000 BC through Summerian, Babylonian, Assyrian, Aramean and Persian periods. Max von Oppenheim first undertook excavation at the site during 1911 – 1913 where settlements dating back to the Chalcolithic period were revealed. Vera explained how von Oppenheim had to transport all his tools and equipment from Aleppo to the dig site at Tell Halaf by camel – a journey that took 20 days!

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Abbey Museum Stained Glass

An Impressive Achievement

The Abbey Church is a very special place, not least because its beautiful stained glass windows. The windows are a large and significant collection dating from the 14th to the 20th century. Some of the most famous are those consisting of fragments originally from Winchester Cathedral’s Lady Chapel.

One of the problems associated with items of such a venerable age is the need for conservation and repair. In 2004 leading glass conservators Gerry Cummins and Jill Stehn of Eumundi examined the stained glass collection and compiled an inventory of the conservation requirements and the cost involved. This amounted to a substantial sum and Museum staff set about finding means of raising the necessary funds.

Fundraising for stained glass conservation

Conservation of individual windows was undertaken as funds become available; through donations and various fundraising efforts. The Abbey Museum Friends undertook the task of raising the funds required specifically for the Winchester Windows. From 2009 to 2012 we held “Walk for Winchester” where participants were sponsored to complete a ‘pilgrimage’ from Sylvan Beach on Bribie Island to the …

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